Read When Breath Becomes Air by Paul Kalanithi Online

When Breath Becomes Air

For readers of Atul Gawande, Andrew Solomon, and Anne Lamott, a profoundly moving, exquisitely observed memoir by a young neurosurgeon faced with a terminal cancer diagnosis who attempts to answer the question What makes a life worth living?At the age of thirty-six, on the verge of completing a decade's worth of training as a neurosurgeon, Paul Kalanithi was diagnosed with stage IV lung cancer. One day he was a doctor treating the dying, and the next he was a patient struggling to live. And just like that, the future he and his wife had imagined evaporated. When Breath Becomes Air chronicles Kalanithi's transformation from a nave medical student "possessed," as he wrote, "by the question of what, given that all organisms die, makes a virtuous and meaningful life" into a neurosurgeon at Stanford working in the brain, the most critical place for human identity, and finally into a patient and new father confronting his own mortality. What makes life worth living in the face of death? What do you do when the future, no longer a ladder toward your goals in life, flattens out into a perpetual present? What does it mean to have a child, to nurture a new life as another fades away? These are some of the questions Kalanithi wrestles with in this profoundly moving, exquisitely observed memoir. Paul Kalanithi died in March 2015, while working on this book, yet his words live on as a guide and a gift to us all. "I began to realize that coming face to face with my own mortality, in a sense, had changed nothing and everything," he wrote. "Seven words from Samuel Beckett began to repeat in my head: 'I can't go on. I'll go on.'" When Breath Becomes Air is an unforgettable, life-affirming reflection on the challenge of facing death and on the relationship between doctor and patient, from a brilliant writer who became both....

Title : When Breath Becomes Air
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Number of Pages : 208 pages
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Review In When Breath Becomes Air, Dr Paul Kalanithi When Breath Becomes Air is gripping from the start But it becomes even so as Dr Kalanithi tries to reinvent himself in various ways with no When Breath Becomes Air by Paul Kalanithi, Hardcover Auto Suggestions are available once you type at least letters Use up arrow for mozilla firefox browser alt up arrow and down arrow for mozilla firefox browser Book Summary When Breath Becomes Air by Paul Kalanithi This is a book summary of When Breath Becomes Air by Paul Kalanithi Read this When Breath Becomes Air summary to review ideas and lessons from the book. When Breath Becomes Air Summary eNotes Complete summary of When Breath Becomes Air eNotes plot summaries cover all the significant action of When Breath Becomes Air. When Breath Becomes Air, by the late Paul Kalanithi For an elegant memoir of the author s turn from gifted physician to terminal patient, told without a hint of bravado or self pity. When Breath Becomes Air Lucy and Paul Kalanithi Very early in When Breath Becomes Air, Paul essentially writes that Lucy is considering leaving him His ambition, the demands of being a chief neurosurgery resident When Breath Becomes Air by Paul Kalanithi At the age of thirty six, on the verge of completing a decade s worth of training as a neurosurgeon, Paul Kalanithi was diagnosed with stage IV lung cancer. Craig Brown reviews When Breath Becomes Air Mail Online This touching memoir begins with him examining his own CT scan with his wife Lucy, also a doctor In that moment, his imagined future evaporates to nothing. Paul Kalanithi When Breath Becomes Air split my head open with its beauty Cheryl Strayed This is one of a handful of books I consider to be a universal donor I would When Breath Becomes Air Bill Gates Bill Gates reviews the book When Breath Becomes Air by author Paul Kalanithi.

When Breath Becomes Air Reviews

  • Lindsay

    4.5 stars! What an emotional book! Dr. Paul Kalanithi was a neurosurgical resident entering his final year of training when he was diagnosed with stage IV lung cancer. This memoir is Paul's story for his daughter, Cady, who was 8 months old when he passed away, just 22 months after his cancer diagnosis. Among other things, Paul writes about his career, his love for his family, his views on the 'doctor and patient relationship' and his eventual transistion from doctor to patient.

    Something that r
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  • Aisling

    Oh dear. I was always told not to speak ill of the dead. It feels awful to give a three star rating to a nice guy (by all accounts) who is now dead. But I simply did not find this book compelling or insightful enough. It is mildly interesting to learn about neurosurgery as a specialty and to read the author's thoughts as he faced diagnosis, illness and then death. I always felt that the author was holding back; that it was too clinical, too calm, just not passionate enough. The first time I felt ...more

  • Rebecca Foster

    Our shadow panel selection for the Wellcome Book Prize 2017. I first read this book a year and a half ago; when I picked it back up recently, I thought I’d give it just a quick skim to remind myself why I loved it. Before I knew it I’d read 50 pages, and I finished it the next night in the car on the way back from a family party, clutching my dinky phone as a flashlight, awash in tears once again. (To put this in perspective: I almost never reread books. My last rereading was of several Dickens

    Instead of being the pastoral figure aiding a life transition, I found myself the sheep, lost and confused.

    Openness to human relationality does not mean revealing grand truths from the apse; it means meeting patients where they are, in the narthex or nave, and bringing them as far as you can.


    When’s the last time you encountered the word “narthex”?! The vocabulary is striking throughout, as in another favorite passage: “A tureen of tragedy was best allotted by the spoonful. Only a few patients demanded the whole at once; most needed time to digest.”

    Paul Kalanithi died in March 2015. There’s a lovely epilogue from his wife – like Marion Coutts, the author of The Iceberg, she’s more than competent to carry on his story. ...more

  • Carol

    "This book carries the urgency of racing against time, of having important things to say."

    I knew going in this would be a tough read for me, and it was, but aside from that, it is a touching, heartbreaking and most "powerful tale of living with death" knocking at your door.

    Paul Kalanithi, neurosurgeon and writer was only 37 when he passed away from lung cancer, and besides the loss to his wife and family, such a great loss to the medical profession too. Oh what more this brilliant man could have

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  • Emily (Books with Emily Fox)

    Do yourself a favour and don't listened to the ending of this book while doing your makeup...

    Theres no way to review a book where the author died too young from cancer leaving his wife and 8 months old baby behind without feeling like an asshole for not giving it 5 stars.

    That’s why more often than not, I don’t give a rating to the autobiographies I read. I just don’t feel comfortable rating someone’s life.

    Cancer and the death of a close one is something most of us unfortunately can relate to and
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  • Eve

    “Servere illness wasn’t life altering, it was life shattering. It felt less like an epiphany, a piercing burst of light illuminating what really matters, and more like someone had just firebombed the path forward. Now I would have to work around it.”


    Paul Kalanithi is just thirty-six years old when he’s diagnosed with terminal cancer. Before entering the medical field, he debated about whether to follow his love of literature into a teaching and writing field. It’s touching that he got to do bo ...more

  • Larry H

    Wow. I had to wait a little bit to pull myself together before writing a review of this exquisite book, even though I am tremendously late to the party on this one.

    "...See what it is to still live, to profoundly influence the lives of others after you are gone, by your words. In a world of asynchronous communication, where we are so often buried in our screens, our gaze rooted to the rectangular objects buzzing in our hands, our attention consumed by ephemera, stop and experience this dialogue w
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  • Jill

    Sometimes you don’t go out and find a book; the book finds you. Facing an impending loss without a foundation of faith to fall back on, I find myself asking, “What is the meaning of life if we’re all just going to die?”

    Paul Kalanithi answers that question in the most meaningful way possible in his outstanding book. A 36-year- old neurosurgeon, Paul wrestled between medicine and literature as an eventual career. Medicine won out and he was just on the cusp of a stellar trajectory when he was diag
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